Sexual ad campaigns

And for women, far from encouraging them to purchase a product, sexualised ad campaigns proved an active turn off.By studying a wide range of publications, using a technique called meta-analysis, the researchers hoped to detect trends not immediately apparent in individual papers.In 1980, Calvin Klein introduced a controversial ad campaign starring a then-15-year-old Brooke Shields.The age-old adage that sex sells may not be as accurate as we assume, according to new research.Images of scantily clad women and sexually suggestive themes are a long-standing staple of advertising campaigns.But researchers have found that, while we may remember adverts that use sexuality, this doesn't result in an increased desire to buy what's on offer.The Conversation UK receives funding from Hefce, Hefcw, SAGE, SFC, RCUK, The Nuffield Foundation, The Ogden Trust, The Royal Society, The Wellcome Trust, Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and The Alliance for Useful Evidence, as well as sixty five university members.View the full list Sport England is to partner with Vic Health for a social marketing campaign to encourage women to participate in sport based on its This Girl Can campaign.

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“Exactly when did paedophiles become your target audience? “This is so offensive to victims of molestation.” The ad campaign also features model Kendall Jenner holding a grapefruit with the caption, “I eat in #mycalvins.” “Does that grapefruit remind you of a specific part of the female anatomy?The strongest finding of the research was that men tend to like ads with sexual appeals while women tend not to Advertising professor John Wirtz, the lead author of the research, said: 'This assumption that sex sells - well, no, according to our study, it doesn't.There's no indication that there's a positive effect.' Pictured is an advert for Braun's Warrior, featuring Jessica Alba The strongest finding of the research was probably the least surprising which is that men, on average, like ads with sexual appeals while women tend not to.While each study generally sat on the fence about the influence of sex in ads, the Illinois team determined that sexual imagery has little effect on what people buy.Advertising professor John Wirtz, the lead author of the research, said: 'This assumption that sex sells - well, no, according to our study, it doesn't.

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